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Soy Beans

 

(Pulses Sprout)

This legume is native to Manchuria and Japan and has been cultivated for thousands of years. With a protein content of over 40%, soybeans are a major source of nutrition for humans and animals. Soybeans also provide half the total vegetable fats and oils consumed and provide a substitute for milk and meat. Soybean sprouts are the "bean sprouts" of Korea and are generally used in soups.

The first written record of soybean cultivation is from China in 2838 B.C. The Chinese farmers who grew this legume fed it to their families as well as to their livestock. From China, cultivation of soybeans spread into Japan, Korea, and throughout Southeast Asia. Soybeans were introduced in Europe in 1712.

Soybeans arrived in America in the early 1800's. The soybeans had been used as ballast for a clipper ship from China and were unloaded to make room for cargo on the ship's next trip. Regarded as curiosities, a few farmers planted the beans. By the turn of the century, many American farmers were growing the crop for feed. It has also been said that the first soybeans grown in the United States were grown in Pennsylvania as a garden plant.

In 1829, U.S. farmers began growing soybeans as a crop and by 1898, the U.S. Department of Agriculture had begun bringing in new varieties of soybeans from Asia. In 1904, George Washington Carver discovered that soybeans were a source of protein and oil. Combines were first used to harvest soybeans in the early 1920's. In 1922, the first soybean processing plant in the United States opened. Soybean pioneer William J. Morse spent 2 years in China in the late 1920's, gathering more than 10,000 soybean varieties for United States' researchers to study.

Dr. John Harvey Kellogg developed meat substitutes from soybeans and soy milk for American consumers in the 1920's.

However, soybean farming in the United States didn't really take hold until soybean fields in China were devastated by World War II and an internal revolution in China in the 1940's.

Henry Ford developed a soybean plastic in the 1940's. The boom in the use of soybean meal for livestock feed began in the 1950's. Today, American livestock - poultry, beef, swine & dairy cattle - consume about 22.5 million tons of soybean meal a year.

Today, more soybeans are grown in the United States that anywhere else in the world - 2 billion bushels each year. Soybeans are grown in more than 29 states. In 2000, Kansas ranked 13th among the states in soybean production, producing 50 million bushels or 1.8% of the U.S. total.

Soybeans can be found in a wide variety of products, ranging from tofu, soy milk and soy sauce to plywood, particle board, printing inks, soap, candy products, cosmetics, and antibiotics.

Soybeans are a rich source of protein, soy bean sprouts are used in salads and casseroles. Soybean sprouts contain small amounts of toxins that can be harmful, if eaten often and/or in large quantities. To prevent complications, cook sprouts for at least five minutes. If you consume them infrequently, there's no need to cook them.

 

 

Soybeans, mature seeds, sprouted, raw

Scientific Name: Glycine max

Nutrient Units Value per
100 grams of
edible portion
Sample
Count
Std.
Error
Proximates
Water g 79.45 3 3.802
Energy kcal 81 0
Energy kj 339 0
Protein g 8.47 3 7.513
Total lipid (fat) g 4.45 3 0.956
Ash g 1.10 3 0.183
Carbohydrate, by difference g 6.53 0
Fiber, total dietary g 0.8 0
Minerals
Calcium, Ca mg 59 3 9.655
Iron, Fe mg 1.31 3 0.176
Magnesium, Mg mg 60 3 5.700
Phosphorus, P mg 135 3 28.726
Potassium, K mg 355 3 41.590
Sodium, Na mg 10 1
Zinc, Zn mg 1.04 2
Copper, Cu mg 0.330 2
Manganese, Mn mg 0.710 1
Selenium, Se mcg 0.6 0
Vitamins
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid mg 8.3 2
Thiamin mg 0.205 2
Riboflavin mg 0.053 2
Niacin mg 1.092 2
Pantothenic acid mg 0.743 2
Vitamin B-6 mg 0.105 1
Folate, total mcg 80 1
Folic acid mcg 0 0
Folate, food mcg 80 1
Folate, DFE mcg_DFE 80 0
Vitamin B-12 mcg 0.00 0
Vitamin A, IU IU 11 2
Retinol mcg 0 0
Vitamin A, RAE mcg_RAE 1 2
Vitamin E mg_ATE 0.010 0
Lipids
Fatty acids, total saturated g 0.617 0
4:0 g 0.000 0
6:0 g 0.000 0
8:0 g 0.000 0
10:0 g 0.000 0
12:0 g 0.000 0
14:0 g 0.004 1
16:0 g 0.448 1
18:0 g 0.165 1
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated g 1.009 0
16:1 undifferentiated g 0.009 1
18:1 undifferentiated g 0.991 1
20:1 g 0.009 1
22:1 undifferentiated g 0.000 0
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated g 2.513 0
18:2 undifferentiated g 2.217 1
18:3 undifferentiated g 0.296 1
18:4 g 0.000 0
20:4 undifferentiated g 0.000 0
20:5 n-3 g 0.000 0
22:5 n-3 g 0.000 0
22:6 n-3 g 0.000 0
Cholesterol mg 0 0
Amino acids
Tryptophan g 0.103 0
Threonine g 0.325 0
Isoleucine g 0.375 0
Leucine g 0.607 0
Lysine g 0.486 0
Methionine g 0.089 0
Cystine g 0.102 0
Phenylalanine g 0.415 0
Tyrosine g 0.309 0
Valine g 0.401 0
Arginine g 0.585 0
Histidine g 0.225 0
Alanine g 0.355 0
Aspartic acid g 1.148 0
Glutamic acid g 1.272 0
Glycine g 0.325 0
Proline g 0.436 0
Serine g 0.421 0

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 15 (August 2002)