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Lupins

 

(Pulses Sprout)

Lupin (albus) have the highest protein and dietary fibre content of the pulses. They also have the lowest starch content. Popular with our Mediterranean and European customers, lupins are used to produce fried snack foods. More recently, the lupin (angusfolius) has been used for tempeh production in Indonesia.

It is probably of Egyptian or East Mediterranean origin, and has been cultivated since the days of the ancient Egyptians. It is now very extensively used in Italy and Sicily, for forage, for ploughing-in to enrich the land, and for its seeds.

Although the commercial cropping of lupins is very new, lupin seed has been used as a food since ancient times. According to Gladstones (1977), the Mediterranean white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) has been used as a subsistence crop for three thousand years or more and the pearl lupin (L. mutabilis Sweet.) has been cultivated for thousands of years in the Andean Highlands of South America. Gladstones (1977) also observed that yellow lupin (L. luteus L.), narrow-leafed lupin (L. angustifolius L.) and the white lupin (L. albus L.) are used as green manure crops in traditional agricultural systems in Morocco and Iberia (Gladstones, 1974), which indicates that the cultivation of these species may have ancient origins.

The bruised seeds of White Lupine, after soaking in water, are sometimes used as an external application to ulcers, etc., and internally are said to be anthelmintic, diuretic and emmenagogue.

In 1917 a 'Lupin' banquet was given in Hamburg at a botanical gathering, at which a German Professor, Dr. Thoms, described the multifarious uses to which the Lupin might be put. At a table covered with a tablecloth of Lupin fibre, Lupin soup was served; after the soup came Lupin beefsteak, roasted in Lupin oil and seasoned with Lupin extract, then bread containing 20 per cent of Lupin, Lupin margarine and cheese of Lupin albumen, and finally Lupin liqueur and Lupin coffee. Lupin soap served for washing the hands, while Lupin-fibre paper and envelopes with Lupin adhesive were available for writing.

 

 

Lupins, mature seeds, raw

Scientific Name: Lupinus albus

Nutrient Units Value per
100 grams of
edible portion
Sample
Count
Std.
Error
Proximates
Water g 10.44 11
Energy kcal 371 0
Energy kj 1552 0
Protein g 36.17 12
Total lipid (fat) g 9.74 8
Ash g 3.28 12
Carbohydrate, by difference g 40.38 0
Minerals
Calcium, Ca mg 176 5
Iron, Fe mg 4.36 5
Magnesium, Mg mg 198 4
Phosphorus, P mg 440 1
Potassium, K mg 1013 4
Sodium, Na mg 15 4
Zinc, Zn mg 4.75 4
Copper, Cu mg 1.022 18 0.070
Manganese, Mn mg 2.382 0
Selenium, Se mcg 8.2 0
Vitamins
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid mg 4.8 0
Thiamin mg 0.640 1
Riboflavin mg 0.220 1
Niacin mg 2.190 1
Pantothenic acid mg 0.750 0
Vitamin B-6 mg 0.357 0
Folate, total mcg 355 0
Folic acid mcg 0 0
Folate, food mcg 355 0
Folate, DFE mcg_DFE 355 0
Vitamin B-12 mcg 0.00 0
Vitamin A, IU IU 23 0
Retinol mcg 0 0
Vitamin A, RAE mcg_RAE 1 0
Lipids
Fatty acids, total saturated g 1.156 0
12:0 g 0.008 0
14:0 g 0.013 0
16:0 g 0.742 0
18:0 g 0.316 0
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated g 3.940 0
16:1 undifferentiated g 0.034 0
18:1 undifferentiated g 3.558 0
20:1 g 0.255 0
22:1 undifferentiated g 0.093 0
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated g 2.439 0
18:2 undifferentiated g 1.995 0
18:3 undifferentiated g 0.446 0
Cholesterol mg 0 0
Amino acids
Tryptophan g 0.289 11
Threonine g 1.331 32
Isoleucine g 1.615 32
Leucine g 2.743 32
Lysine g 1.933 32
Methionine g 0.255 25
Cystine g 0.446 16
Phenylalanine g 1.435 28
Tyrosine g 1.360 26
Valine g 1.510 32
Arginine g 3.877 25
Histidine g 1.030 26
Alanine g 1.296 23
Aspartic acid g 3.877 23
Glutamic acid g 8.686 23
Glycine g 1.539 24
Proline g 1.476 23
Serine g 1.869 24

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 15 (August 2002)